Stop Donating: Why We’re Transforming Giving

No one wants to be a mere donor.

 

No one wants to think that all they did was part with money. The whole point is that we want to make the world better.

 

We want giving to actually drive change, locally and globally. We want our resources to directly equip, enable, and advance the causes we’re most passionate about. Giving simply must be about impact.

 

One of the reasons donors don’t give, give little, or give exclusively to large, established organizations is because they have little idea what impact their money will have. There’s nothing that makes them feel truly a part of the mission. They don’t feel vested in the cause.

 

Donors want to be partners in impact. Donors, and particularly the next generation of donors, want to feel invested in the causes they support.

 

I’d like to promote new language.

 

We want to be donors who charitably invest in opportunities for good.

 

Hence our name, Charityvest.

 

In the for-profit world, good investors take advantage of opportunities based on reliable information and opportunistic timing. They don’t invest in blindly.

 

Why should investing in impact-producing entities differ? It shouldn’t. Donors need reliable information and flexible timing as well. The nonprofit market is much less efficient because both are difficult to achieve.

 

Organizations like Kiva, Charity: Water, and Watsi are trying to address these issues, but they are doing so with limited scope. What if we could move the whole sector toward reliable information and flexible timing? I believe we can over time. We just need to change the structures in place.

 

Up until now, giving has been “about” nonprofits. Organizations themselves have always controlled their own mechanisms for giving (their website, the offering plate, etc.) and the information about their opportunities. Charityvest gives this power to the donor. We are making giving “about” donors. We believe that if donors are in the driver’s seat of the giving relationship, empowered with the proper tools and information, the experience improves for everyone. Donors will make better giving decisions and will feel empowered as a partner in impact rather than just a check writer.

 

When donors come first, nonprofits get partners, not mere donors.

 

It’s no wonder that giving can feel so unfulfilling much of the time. Studies show that donors who give in more purposeful, intentional ways are more fulfilled through the experience. There are five behaviors that contribute to this purposeful giving experience:

 

  1. Give to specific projects.
  2. Give when you know who your donation will help.
  3. Give more frequently.
  4. Give with no strings attached.
  5. Give in public ways (when appropriate).

 

Our Charity Funds will provide the ability to fully act on these insights. Here’s how:

 

Our Funds will give donors flexibility on the timing and size of their gifts to nonprofits, without affecting their tax deductions. This means they can wait until they are aware of specific, high-impact projects or people (1 and 2) to charitably invest in, and do so with relatively larger gifts.

 

Donors can easily invest in giving opportunities as frequently as they like through our electronic payment system, bypassing cumbersome checks or credit card web forms (3).

 

Finally, donors can partner with an organization as privately or as publicly as they like. Donors can inform the organization of their gift, their intentions for the gift, or remain completely anonymous—whatever will maximize impact (4). Our platform will also be social; donors can encourage others to partner with their own causes (5).

 

Charityvest wants to help you become a donor whose investments in charity are both effective and meaningful. Stay tuned for all the distinctive details about what your Charity Fund can do for you.

 

Yours in directing more resources for good,

 

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Stephen Kump, Founder & CEO

 


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